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The Telegraph appoints Sir Nicholas Kenyon

Sir Nicholas Kenyon CBE will be joining The Telegraph as its Opera Critic, it was announced last week.

The Telegraph appoints Sir Nicholas Kenyon
Sir Nicholas Kenyon: “I’m thrilled, after a long and rewarding period of management, to be invited back into the critic’s chair once again.” Photograph: Gabriel Varaljay on Unsplash.

Sir Nicholas has been Managing Director of the Barbican since 2007, and steps down in September, when he will take up his role with The Telegraph. He was Director of the BBC Proms 1996-2007 and Controller of BBC Radio 3 1992-8, and was previously a music critic for The New Yorker, The Times and The Observer. He has served on leading arts boards including Arts Council England, English National Opera and Sage Gateshead.

Sir Nicholas has written extensively about music, including the Faber Pocket Guides to Mozart and Bach, the biography of Sir Simon Rattle and most recently The Life of Music, a highly praised survey of the ever-changing Western tradition. He was one of the original co-editors of the authoritative Viking/Penguin Opera Guide, and edited the influential volume Authenticity and Early Music.

This appointment follows the departure of Rupert Christiansen who recently stepped down as Opera Critic for The Telegraph after 25 years. Rupert continues to write for the paper.

Sir Nicholas said: “I’m thrilled, after a long and rewarding period of management, to be invited back into the critic’s chair once again, at this vital moment in the recovery of the arts. I look forward very much to joining The Telegraph's arts desk, and surveying the UK’s operatic scene in all its growing variety and ambition.”

Jane Bruton, Deputy Editor & Director of Lifestyle, The Telegraph said: “Nicholas will be writing across our Telegraph newspapers and website and is uniquely placed to offer his expert insight and opinion to our readers thanks to his wealth of experience. I am delighted that Nicholas will be joining our superb Arts team and welcome him to The Telegraph.”

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